What... is the “Synopsis Scripturae Sacrae” of ps.Athanasius??
https://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/...ps-athanasius/

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Thanks for the wonderful research on the Synopsis.

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Enthusiasts for the authenticity of the “Three Heavenly Witnesses” passage in 1 John 5:7 are well aware that no Greek manuscript contains it.

This means no early extant Greek manuscript, as about 10 later Greek mss have the verse, some in the margin. And there are few Greek mss before about 800 AD with 1John 5.

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The work was first published by P. Felckmann in Operum sancti patris nostri Athanasii archiepiscopi Alexandrini, t. II, Heidelberg 1600, p. 61-136, with a Latin translation by Wolfgang Musculus.[2]

This seems to mean published in Greek. Since it was referenced in the 1500s, it was likely published in Latin earlier. There may have been some disjointedness with the author's or title's name.

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An example is Erasmus, and the context is the authorship and canonicity of Revelation.

Reformation Readings of the Apocalypse: Geneva, Zurich, and Wittenberg (2000)
Irena Dorota Backus
https://www.amazon.com/Reformation-R...der_0195138856
https://books.google.com/books?id=3WTnCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA141

That Dorotheus’ work is of doubtful authenticity does not even occur to Erasmus, or perhaps he chooses to ignore that possibility deliberately. Moreover, he continues, Anastasius the Greek in his Catalogus (i.e., in the Synopsis Sacrae Scripturae) does not say that the Apocalypse is the work of John the Evangelist; he simply admits that it was received thus. The text Erasmus has in mind here is the pseudo-Athanasian (and not Anastasian) canon dating from the fourth or fifth century and formerly ascribed to the bishop of Alexandria.6 Even though Erasmus in this instance docs not seem certain of his source, he certainly reproduces its contents correctly.

6. Synopsis Sacrae Scripturae 3, PG 28:289-294. Cf. CPG 2249.
If Irena Backus (b. 1950) has this right, Erasmus had either a ms. or a Latin edition.

Granted, the Marlowe translation does indicate Johannine authorship:

and after this there is the Apocalypse of John the Divine, as being the one received and approved by the saints of old and bearing the Spirit of the fathers, beginning, "The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things that must soon come to pass, and he sent and signified it by his angel unto his servant John."
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The three reasons given by Montfaucon are interesting.

As for similarities with other writings, there is no discussion of alternative causes of similarities.

and after this there is the Apocalypse of John the Divine, as being the one received and approved by the saints of old and bearing the Spirit of the fathers, beginning, "The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things that must soon come to pass, and he sent and signified it by his angel unto his servant John."