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Thread: Isaiah 53 - DSS and the MT - Fred Miller site, Dead Sea Scrolls Bible, David Sapp paper

  1. Default Isaiah 53 - DSS and the MT - Fred Miller site, Dead Sea Scrolls Bible, David Sapp paper

    On CARM - post #281

    West and Hort texts from 100 AD
    https://forums.carm.org/vb5/forum/th...98#post5478898

    Take Isaiah 53 as a good example.

    And see if you can find the David A. Sapp paper that compares the Masoretic Text, the DSS and the "LXX".

    The LXX, lQIsa, and MT Versions of Isaiah 53 and the Christian Doctrine of Atonement
    David A. Sapp

    The paper is in the book:
    Jesus and the Suffering Servant: Isaiah 53 and Christian Origins
    p. 170-192

    It is actually quite a fine study.

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    11. David A. Sapp, "The LXX, lQIsa, and MT Versions of Isaiah 53 and the Christian Doctrine of Atonement," detects significant textual and theological differences between the MT (along with lQIsa) and the LXX of Isaiah 53. Comparing these versions with respect to the depiction of the fate of the Servant, Sapp verifies that the Greek texts consistently soften the stronger expressions of the Hebrew texts over the "unjust death of a righteous Servant" (p. 184). This demonstrates the affinity of the atoning theology of the Christian gospels to the MT in contrast with the LXX.

    Review by H. C. Paul Kim
    https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=h...%2F383_636.pdf
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    And I extracted this 11 years ago:

    [Messianic_Apologetic] Isaiah 53, comparison of MT, LXX, and DSS - Jan 12, 2007
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Messia...c/message/1668 (also 4013)

    The LXX has created a significantly different theology of the Servant in Isaiah 53:8-11
    as compared to the Hebrew. In the Hebrew

    the righteous one, the Lord's Servant, gives righteousness to the many
    through a divinely intended sacrificial death inflicted on him by wicked people.


    .The LXX, in contrast, lacks sacrificial overtones of the Hebrew text and the divine sanction it
    places on the Servant's suffering. But it does more than this. It has a different view of the
    Servant's fate. In the LXX

    the Lord vindicates the righteous one who serves the many well by cutting short
    his agony and saving him from death at the hands of wicked people.


    p.182 David Sapp's essay

  2. Default

    On the same page, about the Fred Miller site.

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    And we can use the Fred Miller analysis (emphasis added):

    After all variations are noted and taken into account and the reasons for them (lapses, spelling errors, simple human error in copying, dialectical difference, Aramaic environment etc.) are understood then it is easy to say with confidence that the Q text is substantially the same as the received text of the Book of Isaiah that we now read in our English Bible.
    http://www.moellerhaus.com/qumdir.htm

    His Isaiah 53 section is here:
    http://www.moellerhaus.com/qum-44.htm

    He shows about 20 variants from the Masoretic Text, you can easily see how small almost all of them are.

    (He does not bother with the LXX.)

    You can find a variant of over a verse omission in the second chapter, v. 9-10
    http://www.moellerhaus.com/qum-2.htm

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