The Digital Revolution in Scholarly Editing
Peter Robinson
University of Saskatchewan, Canada
https://www.academia.edu/30214414/Th...rect_Figure_3_

Published in Ars Edendi Lecture Series Volume 4, 2016 p. 182

Ars Edendi Lecture Series Volume 4, 2016 p. 182
STUDIA LATINA STOCKHOLMIENSIA Volume IV
https://www.academia.edu/30852826/ST...NSIA_Volume_IV


In twenty-five years up to 8 July 2009 the British Library allowed only four scholars to inspect the 347 leaves of the great 4th-century Codex Sinaiticus in their possession.5

5- Personal communication, Scott McKendrick, British Library ...
Background:

Peter Robinson
University of Saskatoon
Dip. Ed., (Monash), M.A. & Ph.D. (Oxford) Professor
http://artsandscience.usask.ca/profi...inson#/profile

ITSEE, University of Birmingham
- Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing
Co-founder and former Director of the Institute

In the 2015 New Perspectives book, Peter Robinson wrote:
20 The Making of the Codex Sinaiticus Electronic Book - p. 261


getportrait.php.jpg
Full quote:

It used to be that you needed special permission to see a whole manuscript online, or deep pockets to pay for a facsimile or commission a set of photographs. In twenty-five years up to 8 July 2009 the British Library allowed only four scholars to inspect the 347 leaves of the great 4th-century Codex Sinaiticus in their possession.5 On that day, images of the whole manuscript went online and were seen by over a million people in the next few months. Surely, this is a revolution, and a very fast one.

... the Codex Sinaiticus website: within the first four months of the sites launeh, over 1.25 million people visited it.