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Thread: sense-line homoeoteleutons fit with Claromontanus as source for Sinaiticus

  1. Default sense-line homoeoteleutons fit with Claromontanus as source for Sinaiticus

    This was a rather amazing discovery.
    Right in the sweet spot of the textual critics.


    Codex Sinaiticus Authenticity Research
    Homeoteleuton - Text Omitted Because Of Similar Endings
    http://www.sinaiticus.net/homeoteleuton.html


    The web page gives a nice picture of what and occurred
    And this leads to a number of pages, which right now focus on four cases. (There are more.)


    =================

    homoeoteleuton textbook case ( 1 Corinthians 13:1-2) – W. R. Meyer
    https://app.box.com/s/jnbxtg8et442xtsobklq8k830bwpyvnw

    homoeoteleuton’s layman’s guide – Steven Avery
    https://app.box.com/s/teozkmv0ifshfwdjne4vsgkmjlzjs4sn

    discovery of homoeoteleutons – W.R. Meyer
    A discovery of apparent homoeoteleutons in the Codex Sinaiticus (x)
    https://app.box.com/s/2k4ihkp6op1appn4fw5egvsiw2kw01v2

    1 Corinthians 2:14-15
    https://app.box.com/s/4bwxnlvbqzcugckh8wwem2lpx39yf5jk

    2 Corinthians 4:17
    https://app.box.com/s/pf5eukn01i54q2sn2qzul88rr3u19y5o

    Galatians 2:8
    https://app.box.com/s/glglw14e41yehi0cs518f8ml4g3g954u

    =================

    Forums

    Sinaiticus homoeoteleuton from source ms Claromontanus (D06)
    http://earlywritings.com/forum/viewt...=2936&start=20

    =================

  2. Default NT sense-lines considered to be a sixth-century phenomenon

    Encountering New Testament Manuscripts: A Working Introduction to Textual Criticism (1980)
    Jack Finegan
    https://books.google.com/books?id=fIcU1BFiMBgC&pg=PA40

    §40. Codex Claromontanus (DP), in Paris, contains the thirteen Pauline Letters, then the so-called Canon Claromontanus, which will be described momentarily, and after that, probably added later, the Letter to the Hebrews. Again, the manuscript is bilingual, with the Greek on the left and the Latin on the right, and the pages are written colometrically, with twenty-one lines on the page (for sample pages of Greek and Latin, see Vogels, Specimina, Pis. 20-21). In this case the Latin is relatively independent of the Greek, and has been shown to be for the most part identical with the Latin text used by Lucifer of Cagliari in Sardinia in the fourth century (Souter p. 26). The so-called Canon Claromontanus, which stands in this manuscript immediately after the Letter to Philemon, is an incomplete list of the books of the OT and the NT, together with the number of lines in each. Written here in Latin, the list may go back to a Greek original of around A.D. 300. In its NT portion the list is reproduced in Souter pp. 194f. Reference in the Canon to the number of lines in a book is with the Latin word versus ...
    So now, New Testament science will have to theorize that sense-lines, generally seen as a late Greek-Latin diglot phenomenon, occurred much earlier in the Greek transmission line. However, the "scholars" have been so busy trying to shore up Sinaiticus authenticity that they showed no interest in the textual phenomenon of these homoeoteleutons!

    Sidenote:
    The Canon Claromontanus may have helped guide the Sinaiticus book order.

  3. Default Galatians 5 sense-lines, similar in Claromontanus to Sinaiticus

    James Snapp highlights the sense-line colometric spacing of Claromontanus here:

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017
    Envy and Murder in Galatians 5
    http://www.thetextofthegospels.com/2017/02/envy-and-murder-in-galatians-5.html

    ...
    When considering whether copyists, in verse 19 and in verse 21, were likely to enlarge the list, or to shrink it, we should first be aware of the phenomenon known as colometric formatting. In some manuscripts, when the copyists encountered lists of names or other quantities which tended to begin or end in similar ways, they stopped aligning the right edge of the text-column, and used a verse-like format instead.

    In some manuscripts, the entire text is written in sense-lines, like poetic verse (each measure is called a cola). (The stichoi-count in such manuscripts was not intended to represent the total number of lines, but of 16-syllable clusters, or
    something like that.) As a result, much of the space in the right half of the column or columns of text is empty. There are not very many such manuscripts, probably because this format wasted so much space. The format was used more frequently in the genealogies (in Matthew 1 and Luke 3), in the Beatitudes, and in lists such as this one in Galatians 5.

    Let’s take a look at one of the few surviving manuscripts in which the entire text is written in colometric format:
    Codex Claromontanus, from the mid-400’s. In Codex Claromontanus, in Galatians 5, sometimes a line is occupied by just one, two, or three words. In the text of Galatians 5:19 in Codex Claromontanus, the term “adultery” (μοιχια, usually spelled μοιχεία) appears on the same line as the preceding words. This format could elicit the loss of the word, if a scriptorium-master, after reading aloud to the copyists, “Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are” jumped to the first indented item. In two minuscule manuscripts that have a somewhat special text of the Pauline Epistles, 330 and 2400, μοιχεία was initially omitted but was re-inserted after ἀκαθαρσία (uncleanness) as the third item in the list, as if such a mistake was made, but was almost immediately detected.

    Galatians 5:19b-21
    in Codex Claromontanus (06)

    The colometric format had the advantage of making lists easy to read, if one could follow along with one’s finger or with a bookmark. On the other hand, if a copyist skipped a line – which could easily happen, when several terms in a list ended in the same combination of letters – it would be difficult to detect, since the text of a list, though shorter, would still make sense.

    Let’s take a look at one of the few surviving manuscripts in which the entire text is written in colometric format:
    Codex Claromontanus, from the mid-400’s. In Codex Claromontanus, in Galatians 5, sometimes a line is occupied by just one, two, or three words. In the text of Galatians 5:19 in Codex Claromontanus, the term “adultery” (μοιχια, usually spelled μοιχεία) appears on the same line as the preceding words. This format could elicit the loss of the word, if a scriptorium-master, after reading aloud to the copyists, “Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are” jumped to the first indented item. In two minuscule manuscripts that have a somewhat special text of the Pauline Epistles, 330 and 2400, μοιχεία was initially omitted but was re-inserted after ἀκαθαρσία (uncleanness) as the third item in the list, as if such a mistake was made, but was almost immediately detected.

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