the codex also was cleaned with lemon-juice, professedly for the purpose of cleaning its parchments, but in reality in order to weaken the freshness of the letters, as was actually the case. - Kallinikos Hiermomonachos -

Journal of Sacred Literature - April, 1863
Killininikos Hieromonachos - Alexandria, Oct 15, 1862
https://books.google.com/books?id=kR82AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA212

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1862 - "much altered, having an older appearance than it ought to have" - Simonides, per his 1852 visit

Journal of Sacred Literature - April, 1863
Letter from William A. Wright, Dec 5, 1862
https://books.google.com/books?id=kR82AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA214

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Simonides in The Guardian, Jan. 28, 1863, answered a question posed by Henry Bradshaw:

“Mr. Bradshaw’s very proper and natural query – ‘How is it possible that a MS. written beautifully, and with no intention to deceive, in 1840, should in 1862 present so ancient an appearance?’ I answer simply thus: The MS. had been systematically tampered with, in order to give it an ancient appearance, as early as 1852, when, as I have already stated, it had an older appearance than it ought to have had …”

Journal of Sacred Literature - July 1863
Constantine Simonides, published in the Guardian Feb 4, 1963
https://books.google.com/books?id=kR82AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA485

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Kallinikos:
the manuscript had been “cleaned, with a solution of herbs, on the theory that the skins might be cleaned, but, in fact, that the writing might be changed, as it was, to a sort of yellow colour.”
(The Literary Churchman, Dec. 16, 1862)
(Codex Sinaiticus & the Simonides Affair by J.K. Elliott, p. 77)

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The Christian Remembrancer, interprets it to mean that the manuscript had been:
“cleaned with lemon-juice, professedly for the purpose of washing the vellum, but, in reality, to weaken the freshness of the letters.” (Codex Sinaiticus & the Simonides Affair by J.K. Elliott, p. 78)

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