Luke 4:18-19 (AV)
The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor;
he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted,
to preach deliverance to the captives,
and recovering of sight to the blind,
to set at liberty them that are bruised,
To preach the acceptable year of the Lord.

Isaiah 61:1-2
The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me;
because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek;
he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;
To proclaim the acceptable year of the LORD,
and the day of vengeance of our God;
to comfort all that mourn

Luke - "he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted" - missing in corruption versions

Facebook thread
Doug Kutilek gives Spurgeon quote
https://www.facebook.com/groups/KJVO...8339643286525/

Steven Avery:

The "Heart-Disease Curable" sermon is here online:

The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit: Sermons, Parts 309-320
https://books.google.com/books?id=kH8PAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA341

That gives the year of 1881, right smack in the textual apostasy years. When Hort's mesmeristic control of the decrepit Revision committee resulted in the fogging of the minds of many of the Brit scholars.

You can sense Spurgeon falling into an existential angst!
First, though if you really need a "textual criticism" acceptance of the validity of the text, and highlighting the importance, then we have this article:

Text and Story: Narrative Studies in New Testament Textual Criticism (2011)
by Peter R. Rodgers
https://books.google.com/books?id=0vZMAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA94
Luke 4:18 - p. 93-100
Now to the study, with a special focus on ECW references.

[TC-Alternate-list] Luke 4:18 - to heal the brokenhearted - ECW references
Steven Avery - Jan 3, 2011
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TC-Alternate-list/conversations/topics/3812

Hi Folks,

Generally I use the excellent Laparola website for my primary apparatus checks, with UBS-4 and other resources involved in the final Laparola result. Here is one citation on a fascinating variant .. one that is quite puzzling. (Richard Wilson has just been informed and will be checking the citation and, if appropriate, modifying and updating.) Others may want to make note as well.

Looking up the early church writers for :

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Luke 4:18 (KJB - matching TR editions)
The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor;
he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted,
to preach deliverance to the captives,
and recovering of sight to the blind,
to set at liberty them that are bruised,

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John Hurt
http://www.greeknewtestament.com/B42C004.htm#V18
iasasqai tous suntetrimmenous thn kardian
IASASQAI TOUS SUNTETRIMMENOUS THN KARDIAN,

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Laparola
Luke 4:18
http://www.laparola.net/greco/index....1=49&rif2=4:18
Omit
Origen-gr Origen-lat Peter-Alexandria Eusebius Ambrose Didymus Jerome Augustine Nestorius

Include
Irenaeus-lat (Hippolytus) Hilary (Cyril) Theodoret

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However, inclusion/omission verses are especially dicey in the apparatus (actually all apparatus entries are dicey, often skewed).

Here is one immediate problem, a 300 AD evidence (Gospel of Peter) apparently placed on the wrong side:

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CITATIONS - Peter of Alexandria Canonical Epistle

Peter of Alexandria Canonical Epistle:
http://books.google.com/books?id=BG_YAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA294
indeed, they shall return many fold, desiring to be set free from that most bitter captivity of the devil, especially remembering Him who said: "The spirit of the Lord is upon me, because He hath anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor; He hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised; to preach the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of recompense unto our God."

Is it just a typo in the apparatus ?
Is this listed on the wrong side here and there ?

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ADDITIONAL CITATIONS - Irenaeus, Origen, Eusebius, Ambrose

This looks to be the Irenaeus citation, perhaps the single most significant.

Irenaeus (c 185 AD.)
Against Heresies - Chapter XXIII
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ix.vi.xxiv.html
[For this reason,] those who knew not the Scriptures nor the promise of God, nor the dispensation of Christ, at last called him the father of the child. For this reason, too, did the Lord Himself read at Capernaum the prophecies of Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, because He hath anointed Me; to preach the Gospel to the poor hath He sent Me, to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and sight to the blind.”

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This is Origen from the Commentary on John.
I am not sure if the Greek and Latin listings mean two copies of this, or if there are two citations. Properly listed as omit.

ADDED 2019: Daniel Buck points out, likely not, that Eusebius may have been quoting the "LXX"
"I'm not so sure about this. It seems to me he's quoting from Isaiah, not Luke. Has anyone checked Rhalf's at Isaiah 61:1-2?"


Origen
Commentary on the Gospel of John
11. Jesus is All Good Things; Hence the Gospel is Manifold.
http://mb-soft.com/believe/txua/origenjn.htm

He does not despise those who are poor in soul. To them He preaches good tidings, as He Himself bears witness to us when He takes Isaiah and reads: "The spirit of the Lord is upon me, for the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings to the poor, He hath sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives, and sight to the blind. For closing the book He handed it to the minister and sat down. And when the eyes of all were fastened upon Him, He said, This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears."

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Eusebius. Properly listed as omit.

Eusebius of Caesarea
The proof of the gospel: being the Demonstratio evangelica of Eusebius of Caesarea
http://books.google.com/books?id=jHvYAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA102

I must first of necessity consider the fact that the prophets definitely made mention of the Gospel of the Christ. My witness of this shall be from the words of Isaiah, who cries in the Person of Christ: "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has sent me to preach good news to the poor, to proclaim deliverance to the captives, and recovery of sight to the blind." Our Savior, after reading this prophecy through in the synagogue one day to a multitude of Jews, shut the book and said. "This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears." He began his own teaching from that point. He began to preach the gospel to the poor, putting in the forefront of his blessings: "Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven." Yes, he proclaimed forgiveness to those who were hampered by evil spirits and bound for a long time like slaves by demons. He invited all to be free and to escape from the bonds of sin, when he said, "Come to me, all you that labor, and are heavy laden, and I will refresh you."

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If this is the only Ambrose citation, it really should be at most (Ambrose), actually it would be neutral.
Perhaps there is another ?

Ambrose
On the Holy Spirit
Chapter IX - The Holy Spirit is rightly called the ointment of Christ
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf210.iv.ii.ii.x.html
And so the Apostle says: “For we are the good odour of Christ to God;” certainly showing that he is speaking of spiritual things. But when the Son of God Himself says: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, because He hath anointed Me,”. He points out the ointment of the Spirit. Therefore the Spirit is the ointment of Christ.

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ACCS on Luke is online, yet offers little, beyond also having the Eusebius above.

Luke - Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture
Edited by Arthur A. Just
http://books.google.com/books?id=Gh6sFDUfq8cC&pg=PA79
Origen, Cyril of Alexandria, Ambrose, Eusebius

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Here is Tertullians reference to the verse, neutral in our studies.

Tertullian
Against Praxeas
Chapter XI.*The Identity of the Father and the Son, as Praxeas Held It,
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf03.v.ix.xi.html
Hear now also the SonÂ’s utterances respecting the Father:
“The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because He hath anointed me to preach the gospel unto men.

Here is one Hippolytus citation.

Fragments of Hippolytus
On Daniel 1 - ii:17
http://www.piney.com/FathHippoFragments.html
And for this reason Gabriel says: "And to anoint the Most Holy." And the Most Holy is none else but the Son of God alone, who, when He came and manifested Himself, said to them, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because He has anointed me; " and so forth.

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REVIEW

Citations needed:
Omit: Didymus Jerome Augustine Nestorius
Include: (Cyril) Theodoret

Citations unsure above.
Hippolytus - why listed (include)
2nd Origen
Any other Ambrose.
Peter of Alexandria to be confirmed - why apparently misplaced -- one major correction, so far.

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TEXTUAL ANALYSIS COMMENTS - NA-27, Gwilliam, Scrivener

² The NA27 text follows a textual variant at this point. The phrase (in English): “to heal the brokenhearted” is missing in many manuscripts. The editors of the NA27 text believe that the phrase was added (intentionally or unintentionally) by well-meaning scribes wanting to harmonize Luke’s quote with the Septuagint at that point. (source not given, apparently directly NA27)

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Studies in Biblical and Patristic Criticism: Or Studia Biblica Et Ecclesiastica
George, Henry Gwilliam
http://books.google.com/books?id=CmDG8eqcMLIC&pg=PA227
[]
Peshitto Version in App. Crit. of Greek N. T. p. 227 Gwilliam

For the suspicion, Gwilliam references Plain Introduction, where we see that Scrivener with Miller as editor was quick to follow exclusion (snipping) concepts.

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(A sidestep analysis.)

SCRIVENER-MILLER "suspicion" against TR Inclusion/omission variants

A plain introduction to the criticism of the New Testament (1883)
Frederick Henry Ambrose Scrivener
http://books.google.com/books?id=iBcXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA12
... transcribers sometimes quote passages from the Old Testament more fully than the writers of the New Testament had judged necessary for their purpose ... open to suspicion as being genuine portions of the Old Testament text, but not also of the New.

Let us take a moment to list the other verses from Scrivener.
To a certain extent, conceptually, these verses stand or fall together, depending on your textual framework.

Matthew 15:8
This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth,
and honoureth me with their lips;
but their heart is far from me.

TR and Greek Majority

Acts 7:37
This is that Moses, which said unto the children of Israel,
A prophet shall the Lord your God raise up unto you of your brethren,
like unto me;
him shall ye hear.

The Acts 7:37 TR reading is not Byz majority, it has very strong versional support.

Romans 13:9
For this,
Thou shalt not commit adultery,
Thou shalt not kill,
Thou shalt not steal,
Thou shalt not bear false witness,
Thou shalt not covet;
and if there be any other commandment,
it is briefly comprehended in this saying,
namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

Romans 13:9 - Byz is split, a fascinating textual situation.

Hebrews 2:7
Thou madest him a little lower than the angels;
thou crownedst him with glory and honour,
and didst set him over the works of thy hands:

Not Byz majority, TR has strong support from uncials, minority, ECW, latin and versions

Hebrews 12:20
(For they could not endure that which was commanded,
And if so much as a beast touch the mountain, it shall be stoned,
or thrust through with a dart:

TR contra Byz

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Acts 13:33 - Codex Bezae adds Psalm 2:8
God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children,
in that he hath raised up Jesus again;
as it is also written in the second psalm,
Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee.

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MY THOUGHTS ON LUKE 4:18 & ISAIAH 61

As for the general theory that this was simply an addition to match Isaiah 61:1.

Isaiah 61:1
The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me;
because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek;
he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;

The very early nature of the Old Latin, with the Irenaeus citation, combined with other early references and versions (not covered here), works strongly against this idea. As Professor Maurice Robinson points out (my ultra-paraphrase) conjecturing all sorts of apologetic and harmonistic considerations in the wooly scribal copying of the first two century is way overdone. Most variants are simply copying glitches. And, astute readers here, and common sense aficionados know that the most common glitch is simple text dropping.

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